Filing a Malpractice Lawsuit

There are two important factors to remember about a cause of action for malpractice. First, a client should realize that a poor, unfair, or unexpected result does not mean that any malpractice occurred. Second, in the event that malpractice has occurred, the client must prove that he or she has suffered harm or loss due to the alleged wrongs on the part of an attorney. This is not as easy to prove as one might think. For example, if the alleged malpractice involved a matter in litigation, the client must prove that he or she would have won the case, i.e., a jury would have ruled in his or her favor, “but for” the alleged malpractice. This means that, in proving a case for malpractice, the client will have to actually “try” the “underlying case” before a real jury, and win it, in order to prove the point. Consequently, many lawsuits for malpractice are settled out of court to avoid the time, expense, and uncertainty of such a burden.


Inside Filing a Malpractice Lawsuit